Author Profile: Tim Hanstad

Tim Hanstad
Tim has led Landesa’s institutional growth for much of the past two decades. Tim also has more than 20 years of experience in project management, research, consulting, policy advocacy, training and writing on issues of expanding land access, improving land tenure security, and developing land markets for poverty alleviation and economic growth in developing countries. Tim has worked in 15 countries in Asia, Eastern Europe, Africa, and Latin America, including four years living in India. His project experience includes work with numerous international donor agencies and foundations such as the World Bank, United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization, United Nations Development Programme, United Nations HABITAT, United States Agency for International Development, DFID, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, Ford Foundation, Rockefeller Brothers Fund, Omidyar Network, and The John T. Templeton Foundation. Tim also teaches at the University of Washington School of Law, where he co-directs a graduate program in Law of Sustainable International Development. He holds a J.D. and an LL.M. (both with Honors) from the University of Washington School of Law, and B.A. (magna cum laude) from Seattle Pacific University (1985) in Political Science and History.

A New Chapter

Aug 26, 2014 in Land Rights

During my 27 years at Landesa, including the last ten as CEO and President, I’ve had the privilege of seeing both Landesa and the issue of land rights grow in prominence. A quarter century ago, few people were talking about …
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Commentary Series, Part VII: The Case for Land Rights

Mar 27, 2014 in Land Rights

This post is part of a series developed by The Chicago Council on Global Affairs and Landesa to highlight the importance of securing land rights for smallholder farmers. This series is running concurrently with the World Bank’s 2014 Land and Poverty Conference taking place in Washington, …
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What ‘Downton Abbey’ can teach us about women and inheritance

Dec 20, 2013 in Women's Land Rights

As fans of Downton Abbey know, women’s lack of inheritance rights have brought down dynasties, impelled marriages, and divided families. What may surprise Abbey fans is that women’s inheritance rights are not only a concern for those with fine silver, snuff box …
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Myth Busting: How We Can Really Achieve Food Security

Oct 11, 2013 in Economic Development , Food and Agriculture , Land Rights

The majority of the world’s hungry make their living from agriculture – a cruel irony. They are hungry generation after generation not primarily because of drought, disease, or conflict. Rather, the root problem is their relationship to land. Most are …
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What We Can Learn From the Last Case of Polio

Sep 28, 2013 in Social Entrepreneurship

A two-year-old girl named Arshi was one of last people in India to get polio. Her case is remarkable for a number of reasons. First and most obvious, her case — now more than two years old — shows the tremendous …
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3 Ways to Make Private Land Investment and Individual Land Rights Mutually Beneficial

Jun 15, 2013 in Food and Agriculture

Recently in Uganda, I met Esther, a young widow with multiple children, farming a few acres of land.  Esther’s rights to land – her most important asset – are not secure.  Her land rights are rooted in custom and are …
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A Prosperous New Year for China’s Farmers

Feb 14, 2013 in Uncategorized

As more than 200 million people board buses, trains, and planes for lunar New Year celebrations in their ancestral homes across China, it is worth pausing to consider what this—the largest annual migration of people on the planet—says about the …
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I’ll Tell You a Story

Jan 30, 2013 in Social Entrepreneurship

Reflections from Sundance: The Power of Data versus Story I’ll Tell You a Story A week spent at the Sundance Film Festival usually includes photo opportunities in your best mountain chic, mingling with celebrities, and getting a sneak peak at …
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Spanking, drunk driving and women’s land rights

Dec 10, 2012 in Kenya , Women's Land Rights

What do smoking, spanking, and drunk driving have in common?

Once upon a time they were behaviors accepted by society.

Now they aren’t.


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Getting ALL Children Back to School

Sep 05, 2012 in education

As my three daughters sharpen pencils, don their backpacks, and head back to school, it pains me to remember that far too many primary school aged children — an estimated 67 million worldwide — will never enroll in school. These …
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