Landesa Center for Women’s Land Rights

The Landesa Center for Women’s Land Rights champions women’s secure access to land by providing resources and training that connects policymakers, researchers, and practitioners around the world. We pilot innovative solutions to secure women’s land rights and educate development experts about the gap between customary and institutional law. Our program goal is to build capacity to promote approaches that strengthen and secure women’s land rights through:

  • Strengthening women’s property rights in law and in practice in countries where we work, while closing the gap between customary and formal law.
  • Creating LandWise: A Women & Land Library that provides laws and other resources affecting women’s rights.
  • Growing a two-year fellowship program that trains and mentors new legal professionals on securing property rights for women.
  • Engaging professionals from the developing world to improve their ability to work on women’s land rights.

Why women’s land rights?

When women have secure rights to their land, they are better able to provide for their family’s needs – especially those of their children. Studies show the linkages when women have secure rights to land:

  • Family nutrition and health improves;
  • Women become less vulnerable to contracting HIV/AIDS;
  • HIV-positive women may be better able to cope with the consequences of AIDS;
  • Women may be less likely to be victims of domestic violence;
  • Children are more likely to receive an education and stay in school longer;
  • Women may have better access to micro-credit;
  • Women’s participation in household decision-making increases.

Women produce nearly half of the food grown in the developing world. Often, they do not have secure rights to the land they farm and are denied equal rights to access, inherit, or own it. As a result, these women are at an increased risk of losing their source of food, income, and shelter should they lose their only link to the land they till:  husbands, fathers, or brothers taken by illness, violence, or migration.

From Our Blog

Anuradha Bandyopadhyay

Who Gets to Eat the Fish’s Head?

Anuradha Bandyopadhyay was a Monitoring and Evaluation Officer for the Girls Project in Cooch Behar, West Bengal, India for Landesa. Last month, while traveling in the field interviewing girls participating in the project, Anuradha was killed in a road accident. …
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Roy Prosterman

Four Proven Innovations to Provide Secure Land Rights

The following blog is taken from the remarks of Landesa Founder Roy Prosterman made today before the European Parliament’s High-Level Conference on Property Rights: The Missing Key to Eradicating Poverty. When we are dealing with complicated, stubborn and large-scale problems, …
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Gregory Myers

Commentary Series, Part III: Property Rights for Every Woman and Man

This post is part of a series developed by The Chicago Council on Global Affairs and Landesa to highlight the importance of securing land rights for smallholder farmers. This series is running concurrently with the World Bank’s 2014 Land and …
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